Sunday, December 12, 2010

TALENTED INUUTEQ STORCH, GREENLAND - POWERED BY SOUL



This is embedded from http://www.fata.dk/102/102inuuteq01.jpg . Inuuteq Storch is currently member of FATA a.k.a. FATAMORGANA in CPH.

[@Anders Lund Hansen - a situation in a moment...]

Friday, October 22, 2010

NOV4th, 1530, STRANDGADE 102 CPH

I'm invited to present my work on Nov. the 4th, 15.30 at Strandgade 102 in CPH. Arr. by The Greenlandic Society.

Following soundscapes will be a part of my presentation.

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

TALENTED GREENLAND vol. 56.678

With the slowly approaching season, here is a short run down the Arctic "metropolis'" slope by Rasmus Nielsen. He's the one who won Århus Freestyle Competition in 2009 by "accidentaly" showing up, borrowing a board and showing the crowd and judges how to move the rhythm!

jibbin' storliften from Rasmus Nielsen on Vimeo.

Thursday, August 19, 2010

IQALUIT MURALS 2010



He's back. He's solid and pushing it one step ahead, again. What a big ... whale! Graffiti, murals, Nunavut, community, heritage etc. you name it! Jonathan Cruz - NuSchoolDesign Agency (Cruz has just visited Sisimiut/Greenland as part of Nunavik Youth Expedition)

Images courtesy of + copyright Jonathan Cruz.

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

NON-PROFIT PRINT ON DEMAND AVAILABLE

July 21th, 2010 my PhD dissertation was sent to following recipients

Groenlandica, Ilisimatusarfik Library, MIPIChildren & Youth Research Centre Greenland, Greenland Tourism & Business Council, Ministry of Housing, Infrastructure and Transport – Greenland Government, Tumit Production, Aqqaluk Lynge - ICC Greenland, SANILIN, Knud Rasmussenip Højskolia, Sisimiut Museum, Serrat – Sisimiut Music Academy, Sisimiut MunicipalityChildren & Youth Dept., Greenland Representation.Copenhagen, Ministry of Social AffairsGovernment of Greenland, Ministry of Culture, Education, Research and The ChurchGovernment of Greenland, Greenlandic Children Association CPH, KNR – Greenland Broadcasting Company, NAPA- The Nordic Institute of Greenland.

This (i.e. above) has been possible by a small grant from NAPA - thank you!

Additional number of books sent to different stakeholders e.g. Embassy of Czech Republic in Copenhagen, DPU - The Danish School of Education, anthropologsit Mads Pihl/Qeqqata Business Council, music-ethnologist Michael L. Hauser etc. 

NOW - a number of non-profit, print on demand publications (1. issue) is available by contacting Studenterafdelingen, Univ. of Copenhagen (sta@hum.ku.dk).

To wrap it all up - thank you all for your interest during 2006-2010. 

(Special thanks goes to Univ. of Copenhagen for letting me wait 2 month average; for about anything I contributed to your "system" ...@olimould: 6. u wanna do a phd at ucph? get yourself a big jar of headache pills!)

Sunday, June 06, 2010

CASE STUDY 5.1 - MOTOCROSS+

PhD defense, June 16th, 2010, 13.00-16.00, UCPH, KUA-Faculty of Humanities, room 23.0.49

Sunday, May 30, 2010

ASSESSMENT COMMITTEE

The assessment committee for June 16, 2010 (exact time schedule to be announced earliest June 2nd) goes like this:

Birgit Kleist Pedersen, assistant professor, University of Greenland
Frank Sejersen, assistant professor, Department of Cross Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen
Anders Lund Hansen, assistant professor, Department of Social and Economic Geography, Lund University.

PhD dissertation (in danish) index:


Youth and Urbanity in Greenland – interpreting the city: visions, skills and creativity is a PhD dissertation which examines a particular aspect of contemporary life in Greenland’s second largest town, Sisimiut. Elaborated by ten case studies, young people’s perception and dynamic use of urban settings is set to raise a number of important perspectives on both the present and future elements of urbanity in Sisimiut - the pulse of young people’s visions, skills and creativity, embedded in daily practices in urban space, in both the city and the surrounding country. Given the fact that young citizens in Sisimiut act on the cutting edge, signifying the city's future, this dissertation argues that young people’s continuous input to the city is helping to create an effective voice in the ongoing negotiations of urban resources. The voice of young men and women in Sisimiut encompasses body-centered performative actions, symbolic representations of space, as well as narratives of private and public responsibilities related to localities. In the ten case studies, social and narrative spaces are analyzed in connection with activities such as motocross, trial cycling, skate- and snowboarding, in B-boying, in youth clubs, a work camp and hiking, a short movie about a young man and women living in Sisimiut, an art exhibition and tech-reports about leisure.

Empirically, the dissertation is based on anthropological fieldwork conducted in 2006 and 2007. A number of individual informants between ages 15 to 24 years were continuously observed. Additional data has been collected through questionnaires, formal and group interviews, and participant observations in a wide range of contexts. Apart from fieldwork in both institutional and non-institutional settings, the dissertation presents data generated through action anthropology, as well as disseminating the study process in new media.

Theoretically, the dissertation is founded in an interdisciplinary approach to agency in activity venues, a critical realist theory of interplay between actors and structures, reflexivity and finally, a significant input in examining youth and urbanity in Sisimiut is the perspective of rhythmanalysis. Intensity, seen as an essential rhythm of young people’s engagement with urban settings, is argued to affect both the energy and willpower of the young people to the whole community. Finally, there is a particular rhythm found in the data, namely in the youth activities accentuation of how action reinforces the path to success - new openings and opportunities in terms of the future, yet unknown city.

[This work is part of “Urban Greenland – movements, narratives and creativity, a research project supported by a grant from The Danish Council for Independent Research | Humanities (FKK) (2006-2009)]

Cover design: © Matej Hanauer (FAVU Brno/CZ), 2010
Courtesy of David Brezina - multylingual typeface design and typography
Photo: © Jakub Christensen Medonos (2006+07) & Aqqalunnguaq Heilmann (2008)

Case study 5.2

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

UNDERGROUND

Nuuk Underground Community ready to rock n' roll: For Seconds We Fall, Rockstones, Violet Gib, Handicap Ramp To Party Garden, Torluut!, My Itchy Little finger, Magnetic Northpole...

(Czech Underground during 1970's-90's: Plastic People of the Universe, DG307, Jim Cert, Vysaci Zamek, Eman E, Ministerstvo, Revolver Revue (litterature/photo/anthology-review) etc..) 

Source: Sermitsiaq - http://sermitsiaq.gl/kultur/article118454.ece

Monday, May 10, 2010

WINNIPEG URBAN INUIT STUDY, 2008 +

WINNIPEG URBAN INUIT STUDY 2008
By Kathryn Bloy (Social Planning Council of Winnipeg)
Read here:
+
[][][][][][][]
+
Examining Evidence for Autonomy and Relatedness in Urban Inuit Parenting
McShane et al. Culture Psychology.2009; 15: 411-431
Read here: (need SAGE access)

Inuit have experienced significant lifestyle changes in the past 50 years. Most recently, urbanization has resulted in greater numbers of Inuit living in urban centres in southern Canada. Little is known about Inuit parenting, and nothing has been published on Inuit parenting in an urban context. The present study sought to address this gap by describing the parenting of Inuit living in a large Canadian city and examining emergent themes for evidence of autonomy and relatedness. In partnership with the Tungasuvvingat Inuit Family Resource Centre, 39 Inuit parents completed an interview about their parenting experiences. Based on interviews, major parenting themes included: child characteristics; parenting behaviours and beliefs; affection and love; stressors; and responsive and respectful parenting. The majority of parenting themes linked to relatedness, although there was evidence of autonomy in both parenting behaviours and child characteristics. Results are interpreted in light of the autonomy—relatedness framework and theoretical implications of findings are discussed.


Read more about Examining Evidence For Autonomy And Relatedness In Urban Inuit Parenting - Indigenous Peoples Issues and Resources

Inuit have experienced significant lifestyle changes in the past 50 years. Most recently, urbanization has resulted in greater numbers of Inuit living in urban centres in southern Canada. Little is known about Inuit parenting, and nothing has been published on Inuit parenting in an urban context. The present study sought to address this gap by describing the parenting of Inuit living in a large Canadian city and examining emergent themes for evidence of autonomy and relatedness. In partnership with the Tungasuvvingat Inuit Family Resource Centre, 39 Inuit parents completed an interview about their parenting experiences. Based on interviews, major parenting themes included: child characteristics; parenting behaviours and beliefs; affection and love; stressors; and responsive and respectful parenting. The majority of parenting themes linked to relatedness, although there was evidence of autonomy in both parenting behaviours and child characteristics. Results are interpreted in light of the autonomy—relatedness framework and theoretical implications of findings are discussed.


Read more about Examining Evidence For Autonomy And Relatedness In Urban Inuit Parenting - Indigenous Peoples Issues and Resources


Inuit have experienced significant lifestyle changes in the past 50 years. Most recently, urbanization has resulted in greater numbers of Inuit living in urban centres in southern Canada. Little is known about Inuit parenting, and nothing has been published on Inuit parenting in an urban context. The present study sought to address this gap by describing the parenting of Inuit living in a large Canadian city and examining emergent themes for evidence of autonomy and relatedness. In partnership with the Tungasuvvingat Inuit Family Resource Centre, 39 Inuit parents completed an interview about their parenting experiences. Based on interviews, major parenting themes included: child characteristics; parenting behaviours and beliefs; affection and love; stressors; and responsive and respectful parenting. The majority of parenting themes linked to relatedness, although there was evidence of autonomy in both parenting behaviours and child characteristics. Results are interpreted in light of the autonomy—relatedness framework and theoretical implications of findings are discussed.


Read more about Examining Evidence For Autonomy And Relatedness In Urban Inuit Parenting - Indigenous Peoples Issues and Resources

Inuit have experienced significant lifestyle changes in the past 50 years. Most recently, urbanization has resulted in greater numbers of Inuit living in urban centres in southern Canada. Little is known about Inuit parenting, and nothing has been published on Inuit parenting in an urban context. The present study sought to address this gap by describing the parenting of Inuit living in a large Canadian city and examining emergent themes for evidence of autonomy and relatedness. In partnership with the Tungasuvvingat Inuit Family Resource Centre, 39 Inuit parents completed an interview about their parenting experiences. Based on interviews, major parenting themes included: child characteristics; parenting behaviours and beliefs; affection and love; stressors; and responsive and respectful parenting. The majority of parenting themes linked to relatedness, although there was evidence of autonomy in both parenting behaviours and child characteristics. Results are interpreted in light of the autonomy—relatedness framework and theoretical implications of findings are discussed.


Read more about Examining Evidence For Autonomy And Relatedness In Urban Inuit Parenting - Indigenous Peoples Issues and Resources

Thursday, May 06, 2010

TALENTED ARCTIC

Forward thinking, thank you!
Wasn't aware of this (at all) until today. Check it out;
http://www.kunoki.com/
...."Promote physical activity and create new opportunities for the youth of the Northern communities through a sustainable development approach."...............

Thursday, April 08, 2010

Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study

The Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study - 5 minutes - from UAPS on Vimeo.

The Full Report: http://uaps.twg.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/UAPS-FULL-REPORT.pdf

The UAPS is conducted by Environics Institute for Survey Research. Established in 2006, it sponsors relevant and original public opinion and social values research related to issues of public policy and social change (http://uaps.ca/). Key Findings - http://uaps.ca/knowledge/key-findings/

My outtakes from the report

Inuit. In 2006, 50,485 individuals identified as Inuit. Inuit are the Aboriginal people of Arctic Canada. About 45,000 Inuit live in 53 communities in: Nunatsiavut (Labrador); Nunavik (Quebec); Nunavut; and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region of the Northwest Territories. Between 1996 and 2006, the Inuit population rose by 26 percent (UAPS pp.24).

Half (48%) of Aboriginal people in Canada are children and young people under 24 years of age, much higher than the 31 percent of the non-Aboriginal population. This proportion is particularly high in Regina and Saskatoon, two cities included in the UAPS, which have more than half (56% and 55%, respectively) of their Aboriginal populations aged 24 or younger (UAPS pp.25).

Almost nine in ten Inuit are first generation urban residents, reflecting the fact that Inuit are the least urbanized of Aboriginal groups in Canada. They are most likely among UAPS participants to feel a very close connection to their home community and have plans to return there permanently one day. Nonetheless, majorities feel their city of residence is home, although this feeling is less widespread compared to Métis and First Nations peoples.
Finally, Inuit are as likely as other UAPS participants to think they can make their city a better place to live (UAPS pp.30).

Inuit are more likely than First Nations or Métis to know their Aboriginal ancestry/background well, and derive a great sense of pride from this knowledge. Inuit are more likely to be very proud to be Inuk than Aboriginal and Canadian, although more than two-thirds are very proud of both these latter identities.
Nonetheless, one-quarter of UAPS participants in Ottawa (where the UAPS surveyed Inuit only) are either unable or unwilling to say how proud they are to be Aboriginal, and two in ten are unable or unwilling to say how proud they are to be Canadian.
However, their strong connection to their Inuk heritage does not preclude a sense of connection to other Aboriginal peoples. Indeed, Inuit are most likely among urban Aboriginal peoples to have a sense of connection with other Inuit and other Aboriginal groups in their city. (UAPS pp.44)

Education is the main life aspiration for Inuit, followed by a good job or career, and owning/having a home. Like First Nations peoples and Métis, Inuit define a successful life primarily in terms of family and a balanced lifestyle. In addition, they are most likely among urban Aboriginal peoples to believe that having a strong connection to one’s Aboriginal heritage and living in a traditional way are important elements of a good life. When it comes to overall health, Inuit are the most likely to consider being part of a healthy community an important determinant, and are less likely than others to believe in the importance of physical exercise (UAPS pp.104).

Comment:"Inuit....are less likely than others to believe in the importance of physical exercise" ??????????? (ibid.).

Four distinct world views revealed in the study - see pp.171.

Cultural Romantics represent the largest number (45%) of NA urban Canadians overall. The most idealistic and optimistic of the four segments, Cultural Romantics are unique from other segments in that they possess the strongest belief in the artistic and cultural contributions of Aboriginal peoples to Canadian society. They are most likely of the four segments to think Aboriginal peoples and their culture have made a major contribution to Canada’s national identity, and its culture and arts, and to believe Aboriginal history and culture is an important symbol of Canadian national identity (UAPS pp.181).

YOUTH ---->

A majority of youth are very proud of their Aboriginal identity. Although they are less likely to have some knowledge of their family tree and feel a connection to other Aboriginal peoples in their city, three-quarters of Aboriginal youth (18-24) express a strong sense of pride in their First Nations/Métis/Inuk identity (UAPS pp.42).

Aboriginal peoples in cities learn about their family tree from a variety of sources, but parents and grandparents are key sources of information, especially for youth (UAPS pp.45). +

+ Urban Aboriginal youth (18-24) are almost three times as likely (20%) as urban Aboriginal peoples aged 45 or over (7%) to say they are not interested in learning more about their family tree (UAPS pp.48).

....older (45 years or older) urban Aboriginal peoples (87%) are more likely than those younger than them to be very proud of their First Nations/Métis/Inuk identity. Still, it is important to note that three-quarters (75%) of urban Aboriginal youth (18-24) say they are very proud of their specific Aboriginal identity. Youth (75%) are also more likely than those immediately older (25-44 years of age) (67%) to be very proud to be Canadian, although this gap largely disappears among urban Aboriginal peoples 45 years of age and older (72%) (UAPS pp.49).

First Nations peoples and Métis aged 45 and older are more likely to feel at least a fairly close connection other First Nations/Métis in their city compared to those who are younger. Older Inuit are also more likely to have at least a fairly close connection to other Inuit in their city, however Inuk youth (41%) are as likely as those aged 45 and older (41%) to have a very close connection to other Inuit in their city (UAPS pp.52-53).

Furthermore, whereas older Aboriginal peoples are more likely to have many close Aboriginal friends, Aboriginal youth (18-24 years) are more likely to have many close non-Aboriginal friends (57% versus 50% of those aged 25-44, and 45% of those 45 years and older). Nonetheless, this gap between Aboriginal youth and older Aboriginal peoples largely disappears when those with some close non-Aboriginal friends is taken into account (UAPS pp.54).

Indeed, the UAPS suggests the cultural revitalization among urban Aboriginal people observed by the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples report (1996) continues, particularly in certain Canadian cities. But the findings also demonstrate that some groups, notably urban Aboriginal youth, are less likely than others to participate in Aboriginal traditions and cultural activities in their city. The following points summarize the main findings around urban Aboriginal culture (i.e., the ways of life that are passed from generation to generation) (see UAPS pp.57).

Furthermore, just as a sense of Aboriginal identity is less evident among urban Aboriginal youth (see previous chapter on Urban Aboriginal Identity), so, too, do youth appear to be less aware of the cultural activities that may contribute to a sense of collective identity among urban Aboriginal peoples (UAPS pp.60).

Likely by virtue of their greater awareness of Aboriginal cultural activities in their community and their higher rates of participation, older urban Aboriginal peoples are more likely than others to think that Aboriginal culture in their community has become stronger in the last five years. Youth (18-24) are most likely among all urban Aboriginal peoples to think the status quo prevails (UAPS pp.61). 

One-third of Aboriginal youth in cities feel Aboriginal spirituality is not very or not at all important in their lives (UAPS pp.63).

Age has a substantial impact on urban Aboriginal peoples’ attention to Aboriginal politics. Older urban Aboriginal peoples (71% of those aged 45 or older) are considerably more likely than younger urban Aboriginal peoples, especially urban Aboriginal youth (34% of those 18-24 years of age), to pay at least some attention to Aboriginal politics (UAPS pp.87).

METHODOLOGY  - page 173-...

The Full Report: http://uaps.twg.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/UAPS-FULL-REPORT.pdf


Tuesday, April 06, 2010

LEADERSHIP THROUGH HIPHOP

— Blueprint for Lifes "Leadership Through Hiphop program -delivered in a number of remote Arctic communities.



Courtesy of BLUEPRINT FOR LIFE - www.blueprintforlife.ca

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

GREENLAND GRAFFITI

Something I've been interested in for many years. 1000+ images from 7+ locations. Looking for serious publisher.

Friday, March 26, 2010

TUMIT PRODUCTION TARGETS YOUNG JOB-SEEKERS











The news is out. Greenlandic TUMIT Production just received a grant from Kalaallit Nunaanni Namminersorlutik Oqartussat. The project in focus is ILIVEQ (se short clip here).
Prior to this, TUMIT called upon the media and reveiled that ILIVEQ will include young job-seekers in Nuuk (e.g. Piorsaavik) in the upcomming filmproduction. The work on ILIVEQ is set to start this year. (Those who just clicked the short clip linked above, might have noticed, that TUMIT is also involving the upcoming journalists).

This is going to be interesting to follow. Another example of action reinforcing the path to success.

! connect and support !
TUMIT PRODUCTION
P.O. Box 2443
Nuuk, Greenland, 3900
Web/facebook


(Photo: courtesy of Tumit Production).

Tuesday, March 09, 2010

SIGNS OF URBANITY


(Image courtesy of/copyright Jakub Christensen M.; Kuujjuaq Harbour 25052006)

DAVELUY, Michelle. FERGUSON, Jenanne. “Signs of Urbanity: Visualing Orality and Directionality.” In Collignon B. & Therrien M. (eds). 2009. Proceedings of the 15th Inuit Studies Conference. Paris: INALCO / CNRS. http://www.inuitoralityconference.com
- read here

Study of the use of public space in Canadian Inuit localities for the creation of terms
pertaining to traffic... Keywords: Language in public space, road signs, urban placenames, Nunavik
- read here

Wednesday, March 03, 2010

Narrating Urban Space in Nuuk














Young in Nuuk, by Signe Fjorside (stud. RUC). - . in danish......2009

Ung i Nuuk:Idékataloger udarbejdet af Signe Fjorside i forbindelse med hendes speciale om unges syn på fremtiden i Nuuk.

Read here - Nuuk High School Students

Read here - Atuarfik Samuel Kleinschmidt

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

YOUTH AND URBANITY IN GREENLAND






















Youth and Urbanity in Greenland – interpreting the city: visions, skills and creativity
(2010) ....... (available ....very soon....)

English abstract here:

Cover design: © Matej Hanauer (FAVU BRNO, CZ), 2010. Courtesy of David Brezina - multylingual typeface design and typography
Photo: © Jakub Christensen Medonos (2006+07) & Aqqalunnguaq Heilmann (2008)


Friday, January 22, 2010

Food Chain Wars - Film Premiere - Dramedy

(Image - Courtesy of ItsuMarlo Parlo Studio)

Akiniaaneq killeqaleraangat (2009)

Dramedy by the Greenlandic filmmaker Ujarneq Fleisher.
English title: "The Limits of Revenge"
Premiere - Friday 29th of January, Taseralik - Sisimiut
Af Ujarneq Fleischer/ItsuMarlo Parlo Studio Film
2h, 15+
Script: Ujarneq Fleischer
Actors: Jess Joensen, Henrik H. Jeremiassen, UjarneqFleischer + .

Abstract: Last year's war between Pisiffik and Brugsen suddenly becomes a personal affair for the employees. Brugsen has lost the battle and revenge gets worse and worse. Dan (leading role) comes to Sisimiut from Sarfannguaq to work for Pisiffik with his friends. Immediately, Siiva from Brugsen discovers that Dan has come to town and wants revenge - he carries an USB proving what really happend during the last war. To avoid the police, Dan tries to penetrate the police office. The mission fails, Dan gets arrested. To save him, friends give him a false ID by hacking into the Self-Governmet database. Isaac (Director of Pisiffik) knows a lawyer, who also is an alcoholic and lives in Assaqutaq. The lawyer is the only one who can free him in court............

[Ujarneq Fleischer's first movie 'Tikeq, Qiterleq, Mikileraq Eqeqqoq' premiered in Taseralik December 2008 and had a huge success across Greenland]

Tuesday, January 19, 2010

BOHEMIAN OR NOT

While "Nuummioq" is on his way to Sundance Festival in Utah, Copenhagen has the chance to experience "HINNARIK SINNATTUNILU (Henry's Dream)". This is NOT Nick Cave's seventh album with The Bad Seeds (released in 1992), this is a Greenlandic movie (comedy) about a bohemian (or not) who strives for a better and easier life in the capital of Greenland, Nuuk. One day he receives a call from a friend & ......

When?
February 03 (with danish subtitles) + 05, 2010.
7pm-9pm
At the Greenlandic House
Løvstræde 6, Copenhagen
Tickets - 60DKK; reservation should be made on +45 33 38 15 76 or nc@sumut.dk

Hinnarik Sinnatunilu (2009)
Tumit Production & Deluxus Studio
A movie directed by Angajo Lennert-Sandgreen
Script by Aka Maria K. Hansen – Malik Kleist –Angajo Lennert-Sandgreen
Producer Aka Maria K. Hansen
Dir. of Photography Malik Kleist
Editor Malik Kleist
Colorgrading Lars F. Andersen
Year 2009

Trailer available at Tumit Production FB profile: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Nuuk-Greenland/Tumit-Production/181425075714